Adelaide House Styles Guide

The following photographs are included to give an indication of various house styles in Adelaide. For a more detailed description of house styles in Adelaide, please consult:

‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Settler’s Cottage 1836+

Settler’s Cottages were built by Adelaide’s earliest settlers. The cottages were constructed of local materials such as bark, logs, shingles, clay reinforced with straw, stone, brick or ‘wattle and daub’.

Settlers

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Colonial Cottage 1840-1870

The Colonial Cottage was a more substantial construction than the Settler’s Cottage. They were built out of local stone or brick and usually had brick quoins.

Cottage Cottage Cottage

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Symmetrical Cottage 1860-1915

The Symmetrical Cottage was generally a four roomed dwelling that was symmetrical in design and appearance.

Symmetrical Symmetrical
Symmetrical Symmetrical

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Bay Window Villa 1870 – 1890

The Bay Window Villa added a rounded projection to the plain double front.

Bay Bay

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Villa 1880-1915

The Villa has a step in the double front and an extended gable or hipped roof over the step.

Villa Villa Villa
Villa



Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Return Verandah Villa 1885 – 1915

The Return Verandah Villa has included a verandah that was extended down the side of the house to  a projecting room.

Verandah

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Queen Anne/art Nouveau 1905-1918

The Queen Anne has style is often mis-named as art Nouveau in Adelaide. The style incorporated a ‘Louvre roof’, which allowed greater flexibility in altering the roof shape.

Houses of the Queen Anne style often incorporated gables adorned with exposed ‘trusses’, circular bays with conical roofs, turret top entrances and rectangular bay windows.

Verandahs were decorated with timber turned posts and wooden trellis, instead of iron posts and frieze work.

Many of the Queen Anne homes incorporated stylistic decorative Art Nouveau features.

Queen Queen

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Single Fronted Cottage/Villa 1840+

Single Fronted Cottages were built from 1840 up until the early bungalow period. Single Fronted Two Storey Cottages were also built from 1840 up until the early bungalow period.

Single Single

Age identification criteria is consistent with other examples, such as the symmetrical cottage and villa. 

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Maisonettes 1840-1920s

Maisonettes were built from 1840 up until the early bungalow period. They are sometimes referred to as a semi-detached cottage/villa. Maisonettes exhibit a symmetrical design.

Age identification criteria is consistent with other examples, such as the symmetrical cottage and villa. 

Maisonettes Maisonettes

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Row Cottages 1840+

Row Cottages were built to house the less affluent of the time. They are sometimes referred to as ‘Attached Row Houses’ or attached houses.

Age identification criteria is consistent with other examples, such as the symmetrical cottage and villa. 

Row

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Terrace House 1870 +

Terrace Houses are two storey attached dwellings that provided for the more affluent people in the community.

Age identification criteria is consistent with other examples, such as the symmetrical cottage and villa. 

Terrace Terrace

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Bungalow 1916-1920

Bungalows are single storey houses, usually of rectangular shape, with a front verandah that incorporates a feature gable. Some early Bungalows incorporated the verandah under the continuation of the main roof.

Bungalow Bungalow
Bungalow Bungalow

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Tudor 1928-1938

The Tudor displays steeply pitched gables at the front of the dwelling. The style superseded the Bungalow, with the basic design replicating the Bungalow floor plan. However, larger, more ornate Tudors contained up to twelve main rooms.

Tudor Tudor Tudor

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Spanish Mission 1929-1945

The Spanish Mission style of house was built for the upper middle class. The style featured rounded arches, tiled roofs, and ‘stucco’ rendered brick walls. The general layout was similar to the Bungalow and Tudor.

Spanish Mission Spanish Mission

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Dutch Gable, Art Deco 1934 – 1945

The Dutch Gable/Art Deco styles were variations of the Spanish Mission style. The Dutch Gable featured pitched gables with steps or flowing curves. Many dwellings also had pointed arches in the front verandah.

The Art Deco style exhibited a steeply pitched rendered or stuccoed gable with front feature corbels in dark brick.

Dutch Dutch Dutch

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Austerity 1941-1955

The Austerity style emerged when building restrictions were in force and the house area was limited to approximately 110 square metres. Brick, cement block, asbestos and low quality brickwork were the most commonly used materials. 

Key style indicators include small front porches, narrow eaves, small frontages, lean-tos at the rear and steel frame casement style windows.

Austerity Austerity

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

‘Waterfall’ Austerity 1948 – 1955

The ‘Waterfall’ Austerity style dwellings were often owner-built and were designed to give a fortress-like appearance. The style exhibits striking rounded walls and cast concrete canopies over porches and windows.

Waterfall

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Conventional Gable Fronted 1935-1945

The Conventional Gable Fronted dwellings were built with a gable facade, with the balance of the roof usually hipped.

Gable 1935 Gable 1935


Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981]

Conventional Hipped Roof 1936-1945

The Conventional Gable Hipped Roof dwellings were built with a hipped front and lacked a gable facade.

Hipped 1936

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Contemporary 1950s

Contemporary style dwellings of the 1950s exhibited an angular appearance, with a very low pitched skillion roof of metal or asbestos decking. 

Contemporary 1950 Contemporary 1950

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Conventional 1950s

Conventional style dwellings of the 1950s exhibited wider eaves and were slightly larger than Austerity homes. Homes were often built with a double or triple-fronted setback. Most dwellings used concrete roofing tiles and steel windows frames.

Conventional 1950 Conventional 1950


Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Cape Cod 1960s -1970s

The Cape Cod style is characterised by a large gabled roof structure, with dormer windows sitting in the roof setting.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Ranch Style 1960s -1970s

Ranch Style dwellings are rectangular in layout and display extended eaves and colonial style floor-to-ceiling windows.

Ranch

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Boomerang Style 1960s

Boomerang Style dwellings are L-shaped in layout. They were often located on corner allotments.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Conventional Hipped Roof 1960s-1980s

Conventional Hipped Roof dwellings of the 1960s and 1970s were often built with a double or triple-fronted setback. Many dwellings were built with a facade of thinly sawn Basket Rang stone. Some homes incorporated timber framed windows.

Hipped 1960 Hipped 1960 Hipped 1960

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Colonial Style Houses 1960s-1980s

Colonial Style Houses of the 1960s-1970s are characterised by tiled roof, red brick walls, simple, rectangular layouts and 12-paned double-hung windows.

Colonial Style Houses of the 1970s and 1980s were similar to those constructed in the 1960s. However, they were constructed of cream, brown or red brick, with black or white window frames.

Colonial 1960-1980 Colonial 1960-1980

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Spanish Style 1970s-1980s

The Spanish Style of the 1970s-1980s was characterised by arched windows and low-pitched gable roofs. Walls were face brick or stuccoed brick. Many ‘one-off’ houses were constructed in the period, making the age of the buildings difficult to determine.

Spanish 1970

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Conventional Gable Roof 1970-1980

Conventional Gable Roof dwellings were similar to the Conventional Hipped Roof dwellings of the 1970s and 1980s but incorporated a low-pitched gable at the front of the house.

Conventional Gable Conventional Gable

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Contemporary Homes 1970s-1980s

Contemporary

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Reproduction Styles 1970s+

Reproduction Styles are contemporary homes built to replicate a style from a bygone era.

Reproduction 1970+ Reproduction 1970+ Reproduction 1970+

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Conventional Hipped Roof 1990s+

Hipped 1990+

Semi-detached Dwellings 1990s+

Semi-detached Semi-detached

Home Units 1958+

The first Home Unit was built in 1958. Colonial Style Units were built during the 1960s and 1970s.

Home unit Home unit Home unit
Home unit

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Townhouses 1970+

The first Townhouse was built in 1970-71. The Townhouse was usually two storey with a private courtyard at the front and rear. Brush fencing and landscaping was often incorporated into the development due to more stringent zoning controls.

Townhouses

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Duplex 1960s+

Duplexes consisted of two Torrens Title dwellings, usually symmetrical in design, separated by a party wall. Duplexes were extremely popular in the 1960s but are still seen today.

Duplex

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].