Terminology of Other Disciplines

The following section includes terminology from a number of related professions/disciplines, including building, engineering, architecture, real estate, environment protection and traffic engineering.

If you have a suggested term that is not included in the list below, please include it on the feedback submission form.

Architecture/Building/Real Estate

Asbestos
Asbestos is cement sheeting originally used for roofing in the form of either corrugated sheets or overlapping tile shingles. Asbestos sheeting was also used as wall cladding in timber framed buildings, both externally and internally.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

For more information, see the Asbestos Awareness Website

Battens
Battens are flat or moulded strips of timber used to secure plaster-board ceiling sheets to ceiling joists.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Bay Window
A bay window is a rounded window that protrudes from a basic floor plan. Bay windows can be angular or half round. See ‘Bay Window Villa 1870-1890’.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Barge Board
Barge boards are the sloping boards that cover the ends of roof timbers at the end of a gable roof.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Barge Capping
Barge capping is a moulded board nailed to the upper edge of barge board to secure the roof sheeting.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Bluestone
Bluestone is the popular term for slate when used as a walling stone. The material was mainly used between 1850 and 1890.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Box Gutter
A box gutter is a square shaped gutter that sits behind parapet walls or in the valleys of ‘M’ or ‘Well’ shaped house roofs.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

See information fact sheet from Plumbing Industry Commission.

Brick Veneer
Brick veneer is a method of construction where steel or timber framed walls are externally clad with a 110mm thick brick (veneer) wall.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Canopy
A canopy is an overhanging shelter or porch roof that requires no supporting posts.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Ceiling Joist
A ceiling joist is a timber beam that carries the ceiling beneath it.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Cement Block
Cement blocks are manufactured hollow concrete blocks.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Cement Brick
Cement bricks are concrete blocks made to a standard clay brick size.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Certificate of Title

A Certificate of Title shows the location, current ownership, volume and folio numbers of a property. It will also show any easements (link to definition of easements) on the land, mortgages or other third party interests in the land. The original Certificate of Title is held by the Lands Titles Office. Each time a property changes hands, the name of the new owner is registered on the title.


Clay Brick
Clay brick is made of clay with silt or sand and fired in a kiln.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Colorbond
‘Colorbond® steel is the trade name for prepainted steel sheeting. Products include roofing, walling, fencing and guttering.

Source: Colorbond ® Steel Website

Colorbond is a trade name manufactured by John Lysaght (Australia) Limited.

Concrete
Concrete is formed by mixing water, sand stone and Portland Cement. When it dries, the material hardens to a stonelike mass. It is often reinforced with steel rods or steel wire mesh to increase its strength.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Concrete Bricks
See Cement Bricks.

Concrete Raft
A concrete raft is a reinforced concrete slab floor that ‘floats’ on a soil foundation.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Conical Roof
A conical roof is a steeple shaped roof that was seen on early 20th century ‘Queen Anne’ style houses. See Adelaide House Styles Guide.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Damp Proof Course
A damp proof course is a layer of impervious material (usually polyethylene), which is laid horizontally over the mortar joints of a wall to prevent water intrusion.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Down-Pipe
A down-pipe is a vertical pipe connected to a roof gutter that transfers rainwater from the eaves to the ground.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Easement
An easement is a right over a section of another person’s land to use the property for a specific purpose. An easement can also be a right to prevent the owner of the property from using part of the land in a particular manner. Common easements include a right of way or access to utility or sewer lines.

Source: Real Estate Institute of South Australia Inc. (REISA), ‘Understanding Real Estate Terminology’.

Eaves
An eave is the underside of a sloping roof that extends beyond the external walls.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Encumbrance
An encumbrance is a restriction placed on land and can include easements, mortgages, caveats and leases. These are usually registered on the title.

Any obstruction or obstacle related to the use or transfer of land including things such as easements, mortgages, caveats and leases which are usually registered on the title.

Source: Real Estate Institute of South Australia Inc. (REISA), ‘Understanding Real Estate Terminology’.

Facade
A facade is the front of the building as it faces the street.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Fanlight
A fanlight is a window over a door or over a casement window.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Fascia (Board)
A fascia board is the board that follows the eaves and is fixed to the wall, wall plate or rafter ends. The gutter is mounted to the fascia board.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Finial
A finial is an ornament placed on top or a gable or pinnacle.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Footings
Footings are the base or lowest part of a structure and are now usually constructed of reinforced concrete.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Foundations
Foundations are the material on which the building rests.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Freestone
Freestone is a form of sandstone that is used for house fronts.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Gothic Arch
A gothic arch is a curved arch that rises to a point.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Hipped End
A hipped end is the sloping triangular end of a hipped roof.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Hipped Front
A hipped front is a hipped roof at the front of a building.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Lacework
Lacework is cast iron frieze-work used on verandahs and balconies.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Lead Lights
A window constructed of small panes of glass (often coloured) and held in with lead strips.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Lean-To
A lean-to is an extension with a skillion roof where the highest part of the roof is built up against a higher wall. Lean-tos were common in early Adelaide housing.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Lintel
A lintel is a small beam situated over a door or window to carry the weight of the wall above.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Louvre
A louvre is a horizontal slat that is sloping to allow ventilation but exclude rain.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Mud Bricks
A mud brick is an unbaked, sun-dried clay brick.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Parapet
A parapet is a wall that extends vertically beyond the lowest portion of the roof.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Party Wall
A party wall is a wall that is shared by two adjoining properties.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Pier
A pier is a load-bearing vertical column that sits on or below ground level.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Plasterboard
Plasterboard is building board used for wall linings and ceilings. It is made up of a core of gypsum plaster and is enclosed in heavy paper.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Quoin
A quoin is the external corner of a wall.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Rafter
A rafter is a beam that supports the pitch of a roof.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Reactive Soils
Reactive soils contain clay that expands when wet and contracts when dry. The soil conveys differential pressures on house footings and can cause severe wall cracks.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Reinforced Concrete
Reinforced concrete is concrete that is reinforced with steel rods or wire mesh.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Render
Render is the application of cement mortar to a wall face. It is often used as a finish over poor quality brickwork.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Return Verandah
A return verandah is a verandah that continues from the front of a house down one or both sides.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Ridge
A ridge is the apex of a roof.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Ridge Cap
A ridge cap is the covering on a roof ridge.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Sleepout
A sleepout is a bedroom contained in an enclosed verandah or lean-to.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Stucco
Stucco is rough plasterwork seen on external walls.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Valley
A valley is the intersection between the downward sloping surfaces of a roof.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Zincalume

Zincalume is a steel sheet steel coated with an alloy of 55% aluminium and 45% zinc. Zincalume provides improved corrosion protection in comparison to ‘galvanised’ steel (zinc-coated steel).

Zincalume is a trade name manufactured by John Lysaght (Australia) Limited.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Zinc Coated Steel
Zinc coated steel is steel coated with zinc to prevent corrosion. The popular term is ‘galvanised’ iron.

Source: ‘House styles in Adelaide: a Pictorial History’, J.N. Persse, D.M. Rose, Adelaide: Australian Institute of Valuers: Real Estate Institute of South Australia, [1981].

Traffic Engineering

The Austroads website has a ‘Glossary of Austroads Terms’, which is free to download.

Please note: you must register with the Austroads website to download the Glossary.

Environmental Protection

Environmental Protection Act 1993
Section 3 Interpretation

Environmental Protection Regulations 2009
 3 Interpretation

Stormwater Management

See the Catchments and Creeks website for a glossary on stormwater management terms.

[Please note that this link has been provided for general information purposes only and PIA does not necessarily support or endorse the website’s product or services]

Aboriginal Heritage

Aboriginal Heritage Act 1988
Section 3 Interpretation